Mythology

Canto VII (67-96) Fortune in the fourth circle with the hoarders and the wasters 2017 Illustrating Epic Poetry.

Epic poetry is my favorite read, here in particular is Fortune in Canto VII, passing out chances, fate and the like.  She’s mentioned in Inferno by Alighieri. I paint Fortune holding a wheel, 
keeping in pace with modern atrocities such as the Pripyat Wasteland. 
Remember the yellow ferris wheel  that was never used because every single person in the city of Pripyat city had to run away as fast as they could leaving everything behind, and you would think…but, no, “they” keep making them.
Mythology
Canto VII The Wheel of Fortune with The Hoarders and the Wasters 2017
Canto VII  Inferno by Dante Alighieri 
This book reveals a lot of things about humanity.  It’s called a comedy; Yeah, maybe their punishment is humorous.  The hoarders rolling huge rocks and slamming them into the squanderers, shouting “Why do you waste?”, and they, in turn, shout “Why do you hoard?” 
They are unrecognisable nudes covered in dark slime shouting with twisted angry faces. If the punishments suits the sin, could it be wasting time on meaningless activities?
Today there’s a new sets of hoarders and wasters.  Where do they plan on keeping all the hoarded nuclear fuel rod waste and what are they going to do about the already wasted land; keep adding to it? I ask my self. There is a plan on how to let people living in the far future know that the stuff that’s burried deep below is not valuable like a treasure to dig up; but, an invisible killer.  Our society finds things they’ve dug up every day, so why wouldn’t our distant future dig things up to find out about pre-existing societies like we do?  Could it be that “they”  don’t care because they won’t be here.
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The Divine Comedy

Dante’s Inferno Canto VI (13-15) Cerberus 2016 – Oil on canvas –

Canto VI Cerberus 2016

The Divine Comedy (Illustration)

Dante awakens in the 3rd circle.

Cold dirty rain-fall, mixing with heavy hailstones, pounding down, finally, streaking the nude bodies of the condemned souls lying supine in the filthy mud.  (epic poetry of Dante Alighieri)

Cerberus, the three-headed, dog-like worm beast stands over the souls clawing at the slightest movement made by the supine lying in the filth.

The process of the painting is below.

 

 

Drawing for Canto VI

Drawing for Canto VI

 I did a few drawings like this one above and a watercolor.

 

Canto VI Cerberus 2015

Canto VI Cerberus 2015

Next, I painted a similar version on a canvas with egg tempera to start with.

On Canvas

On Canvas

I started building up shape and color

Egg tempera

Egg tempera

 Then I changed my mind about something

 

Building up the shapes

Building up the shapes

I wanted a frontal view of the mouth

Almost finished

I put everything more or less where I wanted it

The Divine Comedy

Canto VI (13-15) Cerberus 2016

And then I changed my mind again

That’s what I like about art

 

Dante’s Inferno Canto IV Modern Language Version. Written by Jim Belton and Illustrated by Victoria Olson.

Canto IV Limbo 2017

The next day, we came to the foot of a noble castle, circled seven times by high walls. A fair creek encircled the walls, but we crossed it as if it was hard ground. I went in through the seven gates with the sages, and we came to a healthy green meadow.

Jim Belton’s modern language version of Canto II by Dante Alighieri. Click here to read Canto IV.

 

Figure Painting

Dante’s Inferno Canto IV in process – Mixed Technique:  Tempera Under-painting and Resin-Oil Finish.

ILLustration in Process of Canto IV, Limbo

Almost finished…(Inspired by Dante Alighieri’s  The Divine Comedy)

Canto IV Session 17

Canto IV Session 20

The mixed technique is oil paint and egg tempera. The resin-oil drying time is more than a few days.

When drying a painting with this kind of mixture make sure the painting is isolated for a few days since all varnishes are volatile and harmful.

The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri is as Divine as Epic Poetry gets.  There’s nothing pretty about the poem to paint and art has never been about painting a pretty pictures.

I’ve posted three sessions, the other sessions in between were mistakes taken off of the canvas.  ;).

 

 

 

 

unfinished

Session 19

 

Canto IV Limbo

Canto IV Limbo Session 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure Painting

Dante’s Inferno Canto IV in process – Mixed Technique: Tempera Underpainting and Resin-Oil Finish.

Illustration in Process of Canto IV Limbo.

Canto IV Limbo

Canto IV Limbo Last Session

Canto IV Session 8a

Canto IV Session 12

Canto IV Session 8b

Canto IV Session 11

Canto IV Session 8c

Canto IV Session 10

Canto IV 8d

Canto IV Session 9

canto-4-session-8-cover0

Canto IV Session 8

canto-4-session-7-on-easel

Canto IV Session 7

canto-4-session-6a

Canto IV Session 6

canto-4-session-5

Canto IV Session 5

canto-4-limbo-underpainting-session-4

Canto IV Session 4

canto-4-limbo-underpainting-session-3

Canto IV Session 3

session-2-building-up-color

Canto IV Session 2

session-1-light-underpainting

Canto IV Session 1

 

 

 

Dante’s Inferno Canto II Modern Language Version. Written by Jim Belton and Illustrated by Victoria Olson.

Beatriz Summons Virgil

Dante’s Inferno Canto II (55) Beatriz Summons Virgil in Limbo 2012

“I was among those who are suspended in Limbo, when a Lady called me. She was so blessed and beautiful that I asked her to command me. Her eyes were more luminous than the stars, and she began to speak to me sweetly and quietly, with an angelic voice, in her own tongue.”

Jim Belton’s modern language version of Canto II by Dante Alighieri. Click here to read Canto II.

 

Dante’s Inferno Canto I Modern Language Version. Written by Jim Belton and Illustrated by Victoria Olson

Canto I (49-50)

Canto I (49-50)

“and I lost hope of reaching the hilltop. I was like a man who takes his gains willingly, but when the time comes to lose, weeps and is full of sadness. The beasts came at me and little by little pushed me back down the slope toward the dark wood, where the sun did not shine.” 

 

I found Jim Belton’s  modern language version on word press; he’s been re-writing The Divine Comedy – by Dante Alighieri.  Click here to read Canto I.